News

Read the latest engineering research news from the Edinburgh Research Partnership in Engineering

Red blood cells play a critical role in the human body, transporting oxygen to our cells. Anomalies in the way these cells flow through the body are associated with many serious diseases worldwide, and as such, are of great interest to researchers seeking to tackle some of society’s most significant healthcare challenges.

Dr Ignazio Maria Viola, Reader in the School of Engineering, has been awarded a European Research Council (ERC) Consolidator Grant, worth €2M over five years for his Dandidrone project.

Researchers in the School of Engineering have helped develop innovative new technology which could transform how Scotland’s historic buildings are managed, maintained and repaired.

School tech spin-out PureLifi has raised $18 million (£14m) to support a roll-out of its lifi technology to the mass consumer market.

Postgraduate researcher Mairi Dorward has won a research grant from the Worshipful Company of Scientific Instrument Makers (WCSIM) towards her work in ocean renewable energy.

The Scottish Microelectronics Centre (SMC) at the Institute for Integrated Micro and Nano Systems (IMNS) has become the first facility in the UK to install the Heidelberg Nano (formerly SwissLitho) NanoFrazor Explore nanolithography tool.

The School’s Professor Harald Haas is leading the University’s involvement in INITIATE, an EPSRC-funded project which is spearheading research into the future capabilities of the Internet.

The School’s Dr Timm Krüger, who is a Lecturer in Chemical Engineering, is seeking to improve our understanding of ‘placental insufficiency’ through a new three-year project funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

An international collaboration between the University of Edinburgh and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), USA, has been developing and testing an instrument to improve the measurement of currents in fast-flowing ocean environments.

Professor Peter Grant, the School’s Emeritus Professor and formerly 8th Regius Chair of Engineering, has shed new light on historical advances in the measurement of electrical resistance in a journal article published in the Proceedings of the IEEE journal.

Wearing a face mask or other covering over the mouth and nose reduces the forward distance travelled by an exhaled breath by more than 90 per cent, research led by the School of Engineering suggests.

The School of Engineering is to play a leading role in a major new partnership between Legal & General and the University of Edinburgh which aims to improve understanding of care in later life and to revolutionise how it is delivered.